Skip to content


Institute for Research and Innovation in Social Services (IRISS)

Webwatch, September 2014
Published: 
September 2014

The term ‘Enterprise Social Network’ is getting bandied about quite a lot of late. It sounds a bit techie, but it’s really not. Enterprise Social Network (ESN) is a term that emcompasses social networking tools and software, some of which are used internally in organisations such as Sharepoint. However, ESNs also include the new wave of public social networking websites that allow people to connect, collaborate and share information on subjects of interest. Yammer and Socialcast are two popular examples.

IRISS Insights, No 27
Published: 
August 2014

Key points

  • Children in care are likely to have experienced trauma but not all children who have adverse experiences will be traumatised. Every child is unique and their responses to the same adversity will differ.
  • Trauma can affect brain development.
Webwatch, August 2014
Published: 
August 2014

‘Wellbeing is about how things are going for children and young people in their lives’. While the Wellbeing for Young Scots website provides information about what Scottish Government is doing to try and make Scotland the best place in the world for children and young people to grow up, it is primarily by and for young people, to showcase what’s being done in schools and services to support wellbeing. It is recognised that at some point, young people might need some extra help if things are not going so well.

Developing social care and support
Published: 
July 2014

This guide highlights elements that need to be considered when running an experience lab, and how this methodology could be evaluated. Two supporting case studies (working with outcomes and roles and boundaries) are also available which explore the experiences of those involved.

Prompt cards for those who provide support
Published: 
July 2014

Many older people in Scotland feel lonely

Social isolation and loneliness are associated with poorer health and well-being.

A preventative approach looks for ways to maintain and build social and community connections for older people.

These cards are reminders to think about ways you can work with people you support to help them keep connected.

Keeping connected

Think about an older person you support:

NES Chief Executive Malcolm Wright
Published: 
August 2014

The social use of knowledge is an important strand of the Knowledge into Action strategy which aims to make finding and using knowledge a routine part of everyday work. By social use of knowledge we mean the tools, techniques and skills that connect people so that they can share experience and find ways of applying knowledge.

IRISS Director Alison Petch
Published: 
August 2014

The knowledge management strategy for the social services highlights the vital role of social media and urges organisations to encourage and nurture the innovative use of web-based interactive tools for communication, collaboration and learning.

IRISS Director Alison Petch introduces a new animation from NES and IRISS which dispels some of the myths about social media, showing how easy it is try things out and decide what works for for the individual

Experience lab, case study 2
Published: 
July 2014

Context

Positive Prisons? Positive Futures (PPPF) is a Scottish Charity that uses its collective experience of the criminal justice system, to benefit others still within the system, or shortly after release.

Experience lab, case study 1
Published: 
July 2014

Context

South Lanarkshire is moving from a day care centre service delivery model (where daily activities are provided), to a model that supports and facilitates individuals with learning difficulties to access lifestyle choices that they want and need in the community. This change is complex due to the amount of people involved: people who access support, their families and carers, social workers, and day care centre managers and staff, who all have different expertise, skills and perceptions. It also involves changes to existing cultures, service processes and working practices.

Webwatch, July 2014
Published: 
July 2014

Playlist for Life bases its work on the premise that music is for everyone and that it can be used as a powerful tool to improve the lives of people with dementia, either in the early or advanced stages. It encourages families and other caregivers to offer people with dementia a thoughtfully compiled and personal playlist of music that has been meaningful to them during their life. This is delivered on an mp3 media player device such as an iPod. Playlist for Life can be used in home and residential settings.