Education

Building your personal learning network

People who can seek new information, make sense of it, and share it with their colleagues will be an asset to any work team

In today’s workplace we learn with and from one another. This is called social learning. Popular social media, such as Twitter and LinkedIn, offer great opportunities for connecting, conversing, collaborating... and learning from one another…

Mindreel – redesigned and relaunched

Mindreel, the database of films about mental health, has been completely overhauled and redesigned to firmly establish its place as an important and invaluable educational resource.

It now hosts just over 100 films, and there are a few more in the pipeline. The new features include:

  • Improved searching
  • Browsing by topic and type of film.

Visit Mindreel and let us know what you think.

Better learning, better behaviour - George Head

Getting It Right for Every Child: Childhood, Citizenship and Children's Services

Dr George Head, Senior Lecturer, University of Glasgow.

Session 3 - Building Better Childhoods, Responding to Need.

Recorded at It Right for Every Child: Childhood, Citizenship and Children's Services, Glasgow, 24-26 September 2008.

A practice role for nurse lecturers: an anachronistic concept? - Sally Glen

Practical learning conference (PEPE 2008)

The wholesale movement of nursing education into higher education is now a decade old. The catalyst was Project 2000, which was a vision, not only a professional qualification, but an academic one, the diploma in higher education. A review of the literature, however, identifies how the nursing curriculum has always been subject to continuous external pressure and is a balancing act between health service needs, the educational vision of the day and the available financial resources.

Knowledge for practice

Ian Watson from the Scottish Institute for Excellence in Social Work Education and Nada Savitch from the Social Care Institute for Excellence explain how they are working together to enable social care staff to access the knowledge they need.

Key Capabilities in Child Care and Protection

The Key Capabilities (KC) in Child Care and Protection are designed to allow students within social work degree programmes to map their specific learning in this area whilst achieving the more generic Standards in Social Work Education (SiSWE). The KCs further allow social work students to evidence their learning in child care and protection by their progress being assessed at the mid and end points of the programme.