Alcohol

Reversing the Trend: supporting people to reduce harmful drinking

Iriss.fm, episode 124

Reversing the Trend is a resource developed by Partnership Drugs Initiative (PDI) and Evaluation Support Scotland (ESS) with practitioners to help gather and disseminate evidence on the impact of preventative approaches for young people at risk of developing alcohol issues. In this episode we hear from Elaine Wilson, Programme Manager for Partnership Drugs Initiative (PDI), a funding programme within Lloyds TSB Foundation for Scotland.

Conversations about alcohol: making a difference to alcohol-related harm

Iriss.fm, episode 123

The Evidence Exchange programme, an Alliance for Useful Evidence initiative, seeks to encourage the sharing and use of social policy evidence across the UK. One of the programme's themes is the role of evidence in developing policy and interventions that reduce people's risk of alcohol related harm, such as ABIs - Alcohol Brief Interventions. ABIs are structured conversations or other interventions (e.g. online) designed to support people to reduce their alcohol intake.

Foetal alcohol spectrum disorder

Iriss.fm, episode 36

Foetal alcohol syndrome and looked after children. Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder affects many of our looked after, accommodated and adopted children. This complex and emotive topic was explored at a Scottish Attachment in Action seminar held in Edinburgh on 22 February 2013. We asked Paul Gilroy, Chair of SAIA, about the connection between attachment and Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.

Change is a Must (CIAM)

This is where it starts

Change Is a Must (CIAM) was developed in response to the local and national focus on early years, early intervention, and the increase in numbers of children on the Child Protection Register who are affected by parental substance misuse. CIAM reflects priority areas within Perth and Kinross Single Outcome Agreement, as well as national policy.

Revealing Lives: Children and young people's experiences of parental alcohol problems - Louise Hill

Iriss.fm, episode 14

Dr Louise Hill describes her qualitative research study on children young people affected by parental alcohol problems.

Around 65,000 children and young people in Scotland are living with a parent or carer with an alcohol problem. The study involved researching the views and experiences of 30 young people and children between 9 and 20 years old throughout Scotland. The research has implications and presents challenges for professionals working in this field.

Aberlour Glasgow Bridges service - Cheryl Burges, Sandra Sweeten

Child care and protection research

Cheryl Burgess, Research Fellow at the School of Applied Social Science, University of Stirling; and Sandra Sweeten, Aberlour Glasgow Bridges Service Manager. The Aberlour Glasgow Bridges service was set up in Possilpark in North East Glasgow in June 2008, with initial funding for three years. It works with families affected by parental substance misuse.

Revealing Lives: children and young people's experiences of parental alcohol problems

Dr Louise Hill, Policy Implementation Officer, CELCIS (February 2012)

Dr Louise Hill speaks about a qualitative research study she was involved in with children and young people affected by parental alcohol problems.

The research was a PhD study completed at the University of Edinburgh with Barnardos. It focuses on children's views and experiences of living with parents with an alcohol problem.

Talking to under 18s by drinkaware

Nearly one in ten young people between the ages of 16 and 17 drink at least once a week due to boredom, according to a YouGov poll commissioned in July 2009, by the alcohol charity, Drinkaware. The poll questioned 1,071 teenagers, the results of which also revealed that a third of 16-17 year olds would prefer to get the facts about alcohol from their parents.

Film exchange on alcohol and drugs

One of the most significant developments on the Internet of late has been the step change in quality of web-based video. You don't have to be a geek to appreciate the joy of using the BBC iPlayer - or Channel 4's 4oD - to catch up on a missed episode of your favourite TV series. Add to this the increasing affordability and ease of use of digital video cameras and we have the current situation where even small non-profit organisations can tap into the power of new media.