Dementia

Getting evidence into action

Evidence for change
Collection of papers detailing the evidence into action scoping methodology developed through pilots in three health and social care partnerships.

Spotlight on dementia and equalities

Spotlight on dementia and equalities
Launch of a report which contributes to the growing body of work highlighting dementia and equalities and the need to integrate knowledge into practice. 

Playlist for Life

Playlist for Life bases its work on the premise that music is for everyone and that it can be used as a powerful tool to improve the lives of people with dementia, either in the early or advanced stages. It encourages families and other caregivers to offer people with dementia a thoughtfully compiled and personal playlist of music that has been meaningful to them during their life. This is delivered on an mp3 media player device such as an iPod. Playlist for Life can be used in home and residential settings.

Life Changes Trust

The Life Changes Trust (LCT) has been founded to transform the life chances of:

Dementia Managed Knowledge Network (MKN)

According to Alzheimer Scotland figures, there are approximately 86,000 people who have dementia in Scotland, and around 3,200 of these people are under the age of 65. Access to information on the disease - what is is, how it manifests, how it can be treated, and what supports are available - is therefore crucial to ensure best possible care and support.

Leading for outcomes: Dementia

Exploring an outcomes-focused approach within the context of dementia

Leading for outcomes: Dementia

Leading for outcomes: dementia can be used in conjunction with Leading for outcomes: a guide. This guide seeks to explore how staff can be supported to effectively practice an outcomes-focused approach within the context of dementia. It provides information about dementia including key policies and legislation as well as signposts to other relevant resources.

World Alzheimer Report

Dementia is emerging as a major public health issue with serious implications for social care in the future. According to a report from Alzheimer's Disease International, more than 35 million people worldwide will have dementia in 2010 and that number will nearly double every 20 years, to 65.7 million in 2030 and 115.4 million in 2050.