Scotland

Self-directed support and workforce development

ESSS Outline

Self-directed support and workforce development
This summary looks at how the social care workforce in Scotland can be further developed to deliver self-directed support. In the literature reviewed, there was limited shared knowledge about successful staff training and development to support personalisation, despite an emphasis in several Scottish Government reports on the importance of sharing good practice. The suggested approaches in this summary are involving service users in SDS training; person-centred practice; and further developing workforce understanding of the processes of personalisation. This document also highlights the barriers experienced by the workforce in making the shift towards personalisation.

Exploring the relationships between evidence and innovation in the context of Scotland’s social services

Executive summary of report written by Jodie Pennachia

Scotland on map

Executive summary

This report uses theoretical, empirical and practice literatures and case studies to reflect on the links between evidence and innovation in the context of Scotland's social services. It bridges two of the core work streams at Iriss; evidence-informed practice and innovation and improvement.

Imagining the Future: Workforce

The future social services workforce in Scotland 2025

Fully integrated world

Background

Aims and ambitions

Over the next 10-15 years there are likely to be significant changes both in the numbers requiring access to support and the strategies for responding to this.

Growing up in Scotland (GUS)

Iriss.fm, episode 22

An overview of the Growing Up in Scotland (GUS) study, which captures a picture of what life is like for children in Scotland, and the different pathways that children take as they grow up.

The rights and status of children of prisoners in Scotland - Nico Juetten

Child care and protection research

Nico Juetten, Parliamentary Officer for Scotland's Commissioner for Children and Young People discusses the findings of work undertaken to explore the rights and status of the children of prisoners in Scotland. Not seen, not heard, not guilty: Review 2011 reports on a review of progress since a previous research report was published in 2008.

Key issues for longitudinal research design: lessons from Growing Up in Scotland (GUS) - Paul Bradshaw

Longitudinal research seminar

Longitudinal research seminar took place The Scottish Universities Insight Institute, Glasgow, on the 20th and 21st of April 2011. The intention was to identify the core constituents of a robust longitudinal design that would be fit for the evaluation of the efficacy of everyday professional intervention aimed at improving the lives of vulnerable children.