Gypsy Travellers

Co-producing Cultural Competency

Working with the Govanhill Roma Community

Co-producing Cultural Competency
This three-month project was inspired by the Iriss Insight exploring social work’s role in upholding the human rights of Scottish Gypsy Travellers. The Insight highlighted the need for state agencies including those involved in health, social care and social work, to incorporate culturally competent practice into their services to Scottish Gypsy Travellers. It is important for all social services providers to consider how to engage participation from Scottish Gypsy Travellers, for example, staff and foster carer recruitment, local and national policy makers, and local user forums.

Gypsy Traveller history in Scotland

A pictorial timeline

Gypsy Traveller harvesting fruit

Gypsy Travellers are largely absent from history or misrepresented and mythologised in our culture and folklore — often in the crudest and most damaging of ways. Their story is often untold or misunderstood, reinforcing their marginalisation in society with denial of identity, visibility and respect.

Gypsy Travellers and social work's role

Colin Turbett

Friday 24 March saw the launch of Iriss Insight 35 - Gypsy Travellers: Human rights and social work's role - at an event to start conversations to bring about lasting change. The event was a partnership of members of the Gypsy Traveller community, Iriss and Scottish Association of Social Work (SASW), and was chaired by Lesley Riddoch. Held at Glasgow Caledonian University, it formed part of World Social Day celebrations and had 70 people attend.